Gilead Power sets sights on 10,000 hectares of land for wind power

Wind power means natural gas

Gilead Power, whose Ostrander Point project is stalled pending an appeal of the Environmental Review Tribunal decision rescinding approval of the project in a fragile environment in Prince Edward County (the company also has plans for a wind power project on Crown land in the Algoma region), is currently prospecting for willing landowners to lease land for another wind power project.
  According to the company’s website, the proposed Dorland project is in Greater Napanee. There is potential for 40-80 MW of wind power.
  With the addition of a new TransCanada natural gas power plant to the Lennox plant site, the Dorland project will be close to the REAL source of power for wind power facilities: natural gas.
  The company’s website is here.
   According to a joint presentation made earlier this year by the Professional Engineers of Ontario and the Ontario Society of Professional Engineers, “renewables currently use natural gas backup so they cannot achieve lower GHG emissions overall…low GHG emissions are only achievable economically with hydroelectric and nuclear generation.”
  See related story on the Lennox plant from the Toronto Star.

West Elgin residents to Council: no turbines

West Elgin Council asked residents for their opinion on hosting wind power generation projects. The answer? No.

West Elgin residents send clear message to municipal council at a jammed public meeting in West Lorne

By Patrick Brennan, QMI Agency

West Elgin resident Michael Parezanovic makes a point at a public meeting at the Elgin‌ International Centre on wind turbines Tuesday. More than 250 people attended -- most, apparently in opposition to turbines.
West Elgin resident Michael Parezanovic makes a point at a public meeting at the Elgin‌ International Centre on wind turbines Tuesday. More than 250 people attended — most, apparently in opposition to turbines.

WEST LORNE – If it were up to the majority of 254 West Elgin residents who attended a public meeting this week, there wouldn’t be any wind turbines in their municipality.
That was the dominant view expressed at the Elgin International Centre where residents jammed the large meeting hall to hear information about turbines and then offer their opinions.
West Elgin council hosted the meeting as it prepares to debate whether to be a willing or unwilling host for wind turbines.
As residents heard, the municipality does have that option which may or may not constitute some deterrence for developers who are currently approaching landowners to offer them lease agreements so they can erect turbines, which average 80 metres in height.
Residents heard from legal experts their municipality has few opportunities under Ontario’s Green Energy Act to regulate or outlaw turbines.
Regulatory powers are limited to controlling road access to the site and some local bylaws that apply generally to land use.
Carmen Krogh, a health expert who has studied the effects of wind turbines on people, told the meeting the research is clear that turbines can not only annoy people, they can cause issues relating to noise. That’s not acceptable, she suggested.
“We have a right to attain sustainable standards of health,” she said.
She noted recent concessions by the wind turbine industry to aim for a noise level of only 20% by 2025 complicates the issue.
“It really make the health research complicated,” she said.
Residents who live too close to turbines suffer from sleep disruption, nausea and irritability.
“We know these symptoms are valid,” she said.
While residents expressed their anger about the possibility of wind turbines locating here, several people pointed out it is partly due to the fact other landowners are leasing property which would allow them in.
Council will debate whether to be a willing or unwilling host for wind turbines in October.

Blenheim ERT update: awesome witnesses

The Environmental Review Tribunal continues on the appeal of the South Kent wind power project by Platinum Produce,  vs the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and South Kent Wind.
  Platinum Produce Corp has been allowed to continue on with this challenge even though it is not an individual with Charter Rights, and Mr. Tim Verbeek has been allowed to testify on behalf of Platinum Produce’s 50 workers, most of whom are migrants from the Philippines and Thailand. As you may rrecall from earlier reports, the lodging for the workers falls within the setback distance, and the employer, Platinum, is concerned for its employees’ health, if they are exposed to the environmental noise and vibration produced by the industrial-scale wind power generators.
  Arguments too place about medical records, and now, the Michaud family will be testifying as to their experiences, living with turbines adjacent to their farm.
  Nikki Horton was “awesome” with her testimony.
  Rescheduling of this weeks’ hearings is currently taking place, but still to come is the cross examination of Mr. Tim Verbeek, testimony of Roger Oliviera and  Dr. Sarah Laurie.  Then the MOE and South Kent Wind have witnesses to call.
  The Ministry of the Environment is trying a new gambit: they claim that the original project was approved and its original appeal was denied, so how could the amendment, which consists of moving a turbine farther from a receptor and de-rating a few more, could not be approved.
Chatham-Kent Wind Action Group

Update on the South Kent ERT

The Environmental Review Tribunal continues on the appeal of the South Kent wind power project by Platinum Produce,  vs the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and South Kent Wind.
  Platinum Produce Corp has been allowed to continue on with this challenge even though it is not an individual with Charter Rights, and Mr. Tim Verbeek has been allowed to testify on behalf of Platinum Produce’s 50 workers, most of whom are migrants from the Philippines and Thailand. As you may rrecall from earlier reports, the lodging for the workers falls within the setback distance, and the employer, Platinum, is concerned for its employees’ health, if they are exposed to the environmental noise and vibration produced by the industrial-scale wind power generators.
  Arguments too place about medical records, and now, the Michaud family will be testifying as to their experiences, living with turbines adjacent to their farm.
  Nikki Horton was “awesome” with her testimony.
  The hearing resumes in Toronto today but returns to St Mary’s Hall in Blenhaim, tomorrow. Still to come is the cross examination of Mr. Tim Verbeek, and testimony of Roger Oliviera and  Dr. Sarah Laurie.  Then the MOE and South Kent Wind have witnesses to call.
  The Ministry of the Environment is trying a new gambit: they claim that the original project was approved and its original appeal was denied, so how could the amendment, which consists of moving a turbine farther from a receptor and de-rating a few more, could not be approved.
Chatham-Kent Wind Action Group

Ontario government turns “spill penalties” into benefits; but what about wind power polluters?

As the unfortunates who live among industrial-scale wind turbines in Ontario know, the only recourse for the environmental noise produced by the power generators is to call the Ministry of the Environment “Spills Line” which is also what is used for spills of pollutants into the air, onto the earth, or into water.
While spills into earth, air and water are reported on to the public annually, as far as we can tell, the hundreds of reports that have gone to the MoE spills line, go nowhere—they are recorded at the district office, and acted on–or not–but the general public receives no notice of them.
Today, the Ontario government’s PR machine issued an announcement that the penalties assessed industry in Ontario for spills are now going specifically for wonderful environmental projects in the province, through the Ontario Environment Community Fund.
The news release is here
Interesting paragraph:
“The Ontario Community Environment Fund is built on the principle that polluters must pay for breaking environmental laws.”

The people in Communications must have forgotten to add the following paragraph, though, to provide complete transparency and accountability (used to be called “honesty”):
  polluters must pay for breaking environmental laws…unless you are the Ministry itself and bless the killing harming and harassing of wildlife, destruction of the natural environment, and causing health problems among rural Ontarians.

NextEra removes a Bald Eagle nest. Ontario passed legislation in 2013 that makes it illegal for anyone to tamper with a Bald Eagle nest UNLESS they are involved in renewable power generation. Photo by Esther Wrightman.