First Nation reclaims unceded land, evicts gas developers

Stating that government “stewardship” is leading to destruction of the land, the Mi’kMaq of Signigtog are filing a notice of eviction with a shale gas developer. This has relevance to wind power developments in Ontario, where the government is giving extra points and incentives to wind power developers who come to agreements with First Nations in order to construct wind power generation projects.
Here is the news release.
For Immediate Release ~ Media Advisory

September 30, 2013
Elsipogtog First Nation

Signigtog Mi’kmaq Reclaim Stewardship of Native Lands

“There will be no more of our lands being held in trust by governments.”

Elsipogtog First Nation Chief and Council will announce their resolution to reclaim their stewardship over all unoccupied alleged “Crown” land. The Band Council Resolution (BCR) will be publicly unveiled at a media conference at the Rexton shale gas resistance site at the junction of  Highway 11 & 134 at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, October 1, 2013.

Compelled to action by their people to save their waters, lands and animals from ruin, the Elsipogtog First Nation and Signigtog District Grand Council are reclaiming responsibility for stewardship of all unoccupied reserved native lands in their territory.

The lands of the Signigtog Mi’kmaq have never been ceded or sold; for centuries, the British Crown claimed to be holding the lands in trust for them. However, the Original people of the territory, together with their hereditary and elected leaders, believe that their lands and waters are being badly mismanaged by Canada, the province and corporations to the point of ruin. Now facing complete destruction, they feel that the lands are no longer capable of providing enough to support the populations of the region.

Because of these threats to their survival and way of life, the Mi’kmaq people of Signigtog are resuming stewardship of their lands and waters to correct the problems and are planning measures to restore them back to good health.  Last July, the Signigtog District Grand Council notified the province of New Brunswick that they had served shale gas developer Southwestern Energy (SWN) with an eviction notice.

Elsipogtog Chief Arren Sock states, “We will respect everyone who lives and works in our territories and respects the Treaties of Peace and Friendship and our authority over our lands. We intend to be fair to everyone.”

For more information, please contact:
Chief Aaren Sock (506) 523-8201/8221
John Levi (506) 523-5014
Gary Simon (506) 523-1828
Willi Nolan (506) 785-4660

Who’s killing the birds?

A news report is out today on an Environment Canada study of how many birds are killed in Canada each year, and why. Pro-wind power commenters are gleeful: see, they say, it was cats all along!

Well, we knew that.

The fact that the majority of bird deaths is supposed to be from cats, wild and domestic, does not, however, dismiss or minimize the damage being done to birds by large-scale wind power generating machines or turbines.

Here’s a difference: wind turbines typically kill larger birds including raptors such as eagles and red-tailed hawks. Because these large birds have a life expectancy of as much as 20 years, or more, each raptor killed means the deaths of generations of raptors with it.

These birds are critical to the environment, preying upon rodent pests.

So, of course cats, and power lines and buildings are responsible for thousands of bird deaths each year—but that’s not an excuse to kill more with industrial-scale wind turbines put right in the path of migratory birds.

 

Prince Edward County’s “Angry Bird”: don’t kill me too

 

Dead birds: let’s not kill MORE

A news report is out today on an Environment Canada study of how many birds are killed in Canada each year, and why. Pro-wind power commenters are gleeful: see, they say, it was cats all along!
  Well, we knew that.
   The fact that the majority of bird deaths is supposed to be from cats, wild and domestic, does not, however, dismiss or minimize the damage being done to birds by large-scale wind power generating machines or turbines.
   Here’s a difference: wind turbines typically kill larger birds including raptors such as eagles and red-tailed hawks. Because these large birds have a life expectancy of as much as 20 years, or more, each raptor killed means the deaths of generations of raptors with it.
  These birds are critical to the environment, preying upon rodent pests.
   So, of course cats, and power lines and buildings are responsible for thousands of bird deaths each year—but that’s not an excuse to kill more with industrial-scale wind turbines put right in the path of migratory birds.

Prince Edward County’s “Angry Bird”: don’t kill me too