Amherst Island destruction assured: wind farm approved by MOECC

Kingston Whig-Standard, August 24, 2015

Amherst Island wind project approved

By Elliot Ferguson, Kingston Whig-Standard

A map of Amherst Island from the Revised Draft Site Plan by Windlectric.

A map of Amherst Island from the Revised Draft Site Plan by Windlectric.                                            

STELLA – A controversial wind energy project for Amherst Island has received conditional approval from the Ontario government.

The Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change announced Monday the project received a renewable energy approval with more than two dozen conditions.

Windlectric Inc.’s Amherst Island Wind Energy Project is to include up to 26 wind turbine generators and one substation transformer.

The project has been ferociously opposed by many island residents, who argue the project is bad for their health, the environment and the heritage of the island.

The Association to Protect Amherst Island said the project proposal, which the government deemed complete in January 2014, is not finished and leaves too many unanswered questions.

“The Association to Protect Amherst Island deplores today’s decision by the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change to approve a Renewable Energy Application by Windlectric Inc. for the construction of turbines on Amherst Island, the jewel of Lake Ontario,” association member Michele Le Lay said in an email Monday evening. “The APAI team is ready to continue its commitment to preserve the cultural and natural heritage of the Island with a strong legal position and fact-based evidence.”

Since July 2014, the project has been modified four times, including a change earlier in May that lowered the maximum number of wind turbines from 33 to 26 but replaced the remaining turbines with higher power models.

In addition to the project approval, the government placed 27 conditions on the project.

Among the conditions is a three-year time frame to get the project built, requirements to monitor noise emissions and ensure they do not exceed acceptable limits, implement a post construction natural heritage monitoring program, which includes bird and bat monitoring and complete any remaining archaeological fieldwork.

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Form more information, go to the APAI website here.

Comments

Andre Lauzon
Reply

By adding the “post construction natural monitoring program” indicates the Ministry knows there will be problems. They do not care.

Greg Latiak
Reply

Sadly, this approval demonstrates that we are playing a rigged game where the other parties are not interested in facts. The continued procurement of wind energy in the face of balloning costs and power surpluses make it all too clear that the needs of the Province play a distant second to other sorts of needs and interests. With the destruction of Amherst Island as a seasonal sanctuary for owls and raptors (perhaps the last on the migratory path) the true environmental colours of this government should be clear to all.

Barbara
Reply

Does Ian Robertson have any IWTs around his house? A question of interest to all and which deserves an answer!

Barbara
Reply

The project contractors will just hack and whack their way right through Amherst Island!

And the Upper Canada heritage of Ontario means nothing to them either.

Barbara
Reply

Having worked for several years on the c.1784 heritage of the families that settled in the Kingston area, I know what’s being destroyed at Amherst Island. And this present government doesn’t even care.

Barbara
Reply

Windelectric Inc., Amherst Island IWT developer, is a subsidiary of Algonquin Power & Utilities, Oakville, ON.

Barbara
Reply

Reposted from the right sidebar link to The Whig.

This Whig article has a link in the comments section to a Washington Post article of Aug.31,2015.

“The surprising way that birds and wind turbines can coexist”, and this WP article has the link to the “paper” the article is based on.

Journal PLOS ONE, Aug.11, 2015

“Landscapes for Energy and Wildlife: Conservation Prioritizations for Golden Eagle across Large Spatial Scales” by Bradley Fedy and Jason Tack.

Brad Fedy is from U.Waterloo.

Funding by: NATIONAL FISH and WILDLIFE FOUNDATION. Guess who they are?

http://www.plosone.org/article/Metrics/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0134781

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