Ostrander Point appeal resumes tomorrow

ToughonNature

The appeal of the Ostrander Point wind power project approval resumes tomorrow in Demorestville at 10 a.m. The hearings halted abruptly several weeks ago, when at-risk species expert Joe Crowley testified that it was his opinion a permit not be granted for the project due to the danger to the Blandings turtle.

When the Environmental Review Tribunal resumes tomorrow, it will be expecting a response to its direction to the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry to produce documentation on the permit process and Mr Crowley’s recommendation. The Ministry has already telegraphed to the media that its process is “nuanced” and approvals are not based on the opinion of just one staff member.

The appeal will be heard September 23-25 in Demorestville at the community hall. The appellant is the Prince Edward County Field Naturalists who are in need of funding to cover legal costs for this multi-year fight. For more information go to www.saveostranderpoint.org

For more information on efforts to protect the entire area of Prince Edward County, go to Point2Point Foundation here.

 

Report: corporate interests rule at the Environmental Protection Agency

Big Green rules at the EPA in the U.S.; in Ontario, endangered species sacrificed to wind power development
Big Green rules at the EPA in the U.S.; in Ontario, endangered species sacrificed to wind power development

This report is fascinating; it confirms that ideology and profit–not science–may be driving energy  and environment policy. In Ontario, we have the resumption of the Ostrander Point appeal tomorrow where a wildlife expert’s recommendation to NOT build a wind power plant because of the danger to wildlife was over-ruled by the government actively pursuing an environmental ideology.

Forbes.com September 18, 2015

The Energy & Environmental Legal Institute is a D.C.-based advocacy group dedicated to “free market environmentalism through strategic litigation.”

Recently, E&E has been examining environmental policy by searching public records and filing FOIA requests with state and federal agencies, and then tenaciously litigating over the resulting efforts at obfuscation. The strategy requires patience, given government’s endless capacity for stalling and mendacity, but it is producing results, and E&E has issued a series of reports (listed at the end of this post).

The tale told is appalling. The demarcation between the EPA and the major environmental groups is blurred to the point of non-existence. The revolving door spins like a top, and the meetings, memoranda, and plotting are continuous, with NGO staff acting as de facto agency staff, and vice versa.

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