Challenges ahead in 2018 for social, environmental justice in Ontario

House Finch on Amherst Island: industrial-scale wind power development can’t trump environmental protection

January 1, 2018

Best wishes to all for the year ahead.

The Ontario government is still processing five wind power contracts awarded under the 2016 Large Renewable Procurement I (LRP I), despite concerns about the environment and health and the fact that Ontario has a surplus of power. With thousands of noise complaints recorded with the government unresolved, the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) refuses to acknowledge that it has a problem, and refuses to look for causes, relying instead on its clearly inadequate set of regulations.

One of our favourite quotes in 2017 came from a hydrogeologist who pointed out, referring to the problems with water wells in Chatham-Kent, if you have a model that says you’re not going to have problems, then you experience problems, then it’s the model that is wrong.

The fact that wind power development on the industrial or utility scale has many significant problems — energy poverty, environmental damage, adverse health effects, negative impact on rural communities — is now better understood by the people in Ontario, and the media. In 2017, two major networks, Global News and Radio-Canada, carried multi-part investigative reports this past year. The three-part Global News feature spurred questions in the Legislature and forced the then-minister to act on noise complaints for several Huron County families.

The Huron County public health follow-up of noise complaints was finally launched by the Health Unit there; other health units are watching attentively. We believe 2018 will be the year when the Government of Ontario is forced to live up to its mandate and take steps to protect the health of its residents.

And, the legal battles continue, with actions taking place both inside the legislated appeal process for wind power projects, and in the courts. There have been victories: there will be more.

In her Christmas Message this year, the Queen spoke of the importance of “home”:  ” … the idea of home reaches beyond a physical building, to a home town or city,” she said.

We in Ontario think of our “home” as being our communities, the landscape, the natural environment — indeed, the entire province and all the people in it. We will continue to fight for justice for the environment and for families this year.

 

WIND CONCERNS ONTARIO

Please join us: click on the Join/Donate button above.

Comments

DJ
Reply

Happy New Year.WCO. You have started 2018 with a profound and inspiring message. Thank you for all you do to educate Ontarians about the plunder of social and environmental justice for Ontario communities by an indifferent government and profit-seeking wind outfits. The one coming to Sudbury area – 87 Vesta 3.45 MG turbines – “This landmark project is a first on many fronts: largest wind project in Ontario, largest on-reserve wind installation in Canada, highest hub heights in North America, and the first to develop a First Nation Environmental Stewardship Regime under the First Nations Lands Management Act,” said Mike Garland, CEO of Pattern Development – was approved by the IESO in 2010. The current LREP suspension is meaningless when the government allows the IESO to let these huge Korean Consortium projects proceed. Wind projects are clearly not suspended, just one avenue is on temporary hold. Like the Dutton-Dunwich situation, this energy plant is not needed. Best wishes for 2018 – continue the struggle!

Wind Concerns Ontario
Reply

The Henvey Inlet project is a unique one, with Ontario, Canada, and First Nations involved as well as a grant from the federal government. Our question: why? The power is not needed in Ontario, and the project will be far from the areas of high power demand, i.e., in southern Ontario. Wind is green, wind is good, keep repeating…

Barbara
Reply

Now the frozen water tank problem has shown up.

Barbara
Reply

PubMed, 2014

Abstract:

‘Low-cost field test kits for arsenic detection in water’

Re: Use of paper strips for detection.

Similar articles on same webpage.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24117090

Barbara
Reply

As I recall, there were severe winter cold spells back in the late seventies and early eighties?

Notinduttondunwich
Reply

These folks may survive this round of disconnects this winter but not next winter… in the spring all the folks in arrears will be voluntarily put on prepay to help them better manage their electric habits…. you know…. Hydro None is just trying to help these folks.

Notinduttondunwich
Reply

Legislation prevents the power utility from disconnection in winter… after voluntarily being put on prepay due to non payment…. (this will be done by offering you 2 choices… first $1000.00 deposit or the other… prepay meter!!)
The utility won’t be responsible for disconnections… you will!!!

Stan Thayer
Reply

My day started quite different 20 years ago on January 5th.
All the election promises came due overnight. Noone took responsibility for the costly emergency preparedness schemes that were not working. Even the much touted emergency radio network completely failed. The government installed, “Emergency Coordinators” finally had a chance to earn their pay but instead ran like rats to Florida.
Some of the best generator technicians in the country came out of the 98 ice storm.
IWT’S are the same government B.S. just change the names.
Stan Thayer

Sommer
Reply

“The three-part Global News feature spurred questions in the Legislature and forced the then-minister to act on noise complaints for several Huron County families.”
Would whoever wrote this article, please provide details of precisely how Minister Glen Murray took action as a result of the “questions in the Legislature” and exactly how his action protected people in HC being harmed?

Wind Concerns Ontario
Reply

Minister Murray did engage in several personal telephone calls with the Huron County families involved and promised action. Unfortunately, he probably already had his resignation letter written and he was out the door a scant few weeks later; the families continue to negotiate with the MOECC, more than six months after those ministerial conversations.

Sommer
Reply

Thanks for the clarification. The people being harmed in HC continue to be harmed.

Stan Thayer
Reply

Sheesh, how hydro in Ontario has changed in 20 short years. During the January 1998 ice storm we had meetings and discussed who would get the power back first.
Now it’s January 2018 no ice storm and someone will have to decide where the power will be taken out first.
Thousands are going onto pre-pay because of arrears due to the high costs of the Liberals, “Green Energy Act”.
I suggest all monies going to the IWT’S be diverted to those on pre-pay right away.
Easily done!
Shut the IWT’S down now and deal with the owners later.
Ontario has become a Liberal mess.
Stan Thayer

Leave a Reply to Stan ThayerCancel reply

name*

email* (not published)

website