Nation Rise wind power project not in the “public interest” –petition launched

Rushed approval, outdated noise assessment and significant environmental risks to power project spur community to file a petition

February 8, 2019

The community group Concerned Citizens of North Stormont have launched a petition for their MPP Jim McDonell to take to the Ontario Legislature within days. The petition says the 100-megawatt wind power project is not “in the public interest” and its Renewable Energy Approval should be revoked.

The community group has also filed a direct appeal with the Minister of Environment, Conservation and Parks.

Why?

Nation Rise means more cost added everyone’s electricity bills.
It was approved using outdated and flawed noise assessment protocols.
It will expose hundreds of people to wind turbine noise emissions.
There are very serious environmental concerns with the project.
And,
its approval was rushed through before the election by the Wynne government, without adequate assessments.
Parker Gallant says the power from this project will be like a “fly on the flank of an elephant” — we don’t need to pay the $450 million for this power plant. Profits from the wind power project will go to interests in Portugal, the U.S., and China.
Let’s stop this thing.
Please sign the attached petition and mail it to their MPP Jim McDonell, as soon as you can. Today, if possible.
Let’s have no more personal and environmental damage done to us all by industrial wind turbines.
Thank you
Jane Wilson
President
WIND CONCERNS ONTARIO
P.S. If you can help further by printing this off or emailing it to your network of friends and family, please do.

Comments

diane parent
Reply

and they really think this is green energy. What it looks like and what it is , are two different things. Just more money in corporate hands.

Wind Concerns Ontario
Reply

EDPR, the proponent of this project, is partly owned by the Axium consortium headquartered in the U.S. and parent company EDP is owned by interests in Portugal and the U.S. Promises of long-term employment for people in the area are over-stated—the Concerned Citizens group estimates they might be five net permanent jobs.

Sommer
Reply

Could someone please explain the comment at WCO facebook enclosed below?
Please publish WCO’s critique of Dr. Mariana Alves-Pereira’s findings on LFN and infrasound from turbines. Please publish a response to her public statement that knowing what she knows , she would not live within 20 kms of a wind turbine.
Also please explain the statement below, in light of the most recently published comment, to the article written by Carmen Krogh and Dr. Robert McMurty on harm from wind turbines and published in the CMAJ blog titled ‘Too Little
Too Late’
What could possibly be more clear evidence of harm?

Here is the comment Im referring to:

Wind Concerns Ontario
Yesterday at 4:52 AM ·
Truth on health research and wind turbine noise emissions: not enough of it done. (The people who want research don’t have the money, and the people with the money don’t want the research.) https://www.lockportjournal.com/…/article_218e257e-cc79-53f…

Wind Concerns Ontario
Reply

We agree with you but the world of academia doesn’t: they want to see consistent methodology used throughout many studies. Please read the WHO document that we were referring to. In the meantime, on-the-ground work like the Huron County Health Unit study would have been a foundation to support more epidemiological research in Ontario, but that work will now be rendered insignificant because of poor participation. That played right into Big Wind’s assertion: there are just a few people complaining; when you ask people to come forward and have their experiences documented, they won’t.

Richard Mann
Reply

On October 28, 2108 I wrote to Health Minister Christine Elliot requesting an urgent meeting on wind turbines. It has been more than three months and I have not heard anything back.

Can someone at WCO or elsewhere broker such a meeting? We need an open and public dialog with the decision makers on this issue.

Richard Mann
University of Waterloo
https://cs.uwaterloo.ca/~mannr/Wind_Turbines.html

Bernie Cusack
Reply

How do you check for whatever turbines put out that has an effect on sleep? I would have thought we lived far enough from turbines that we would not be affected but sleep is affected by something and you now have me wondering. We are probably about 2k as the crow flies.

Wind Concerns Ontario
Reply

Studies have shown the effects of wind turbines can extend for some distance. Dr Michael Nissenbaum, for example, found that people were experiencing effects miles away from turbines. You may wish to view any of the videos of a presentation by Dr. Mariana Alves-Pereira, who has worked with infrasound in the military and the aviation field; her work shows that infrasound can be experienced up to 20 km away.
You may wish to look up a paper on occupational infrasound exposure published on thee U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) website, dated 1999, which details the symptoms of infrasound exposure: headache, dizziness, vertigo, nausea, sleep disturbance, and more. If you feel you would like to see your doctor/nurse practitioner/health clinic about this, we have an information package you might consider taking with you.

Richard Mann
Reply

Important 28-minute documentary by the science programme “planet e.” of the second German television ZDF — November 4, 2018

That link above has a different title. If it does not work, please try this one:
https://youtu.be/ywWNx3OJyuo

Stan Thayer
Reply

Hey Bernie, here is what I have done around some of the wind farms.
Take a fairly large pan, any type of material and any colour.
Fill it with water nearly full, set it on any solid hard surface and watch the ripples.
The Ontario electrical grid operates at 60 cycles per second or 3600 maximums and minimums per minute.
If you have constant ripples it is probably not the windmills or you are simply to close.
If you notice a distinct defined ripple it is the local windmills in sync rotating approximately 20 revolutions per minute.
Take any cell phone and video the water ripple with the windmills in the background. You will see the blades at the same spot each time you see the ripple.
If you hear the 3600 hertz whine you are way to close but your hearing is ok.
Kind of school kid-ish but fun and something to do on the long summer evenings when I was dispatched far from home.
Stan the power man

Dave Van De Cappelle
Reply

I think Windmills are waste of money, destroy folks health and kill many birds. The Green Energy Act which the liberals enacted was the worst piece of Legislation ever enacted by any government ever in Ontario’s history, and there should be criminal charges to both Wynne and McGuinty for enacting this awful piece of legislation.

Sommer
Reply

At this point, we now have complicity on the part of this new government as well. We were so hopeful that they would do the right thing and cancel contracts because of the harm.
When an expert on LFN and infrasound from turbines states publicly that knowing what she now knows, she would not live within 20 kms of a turbine, what on earth are those who are surrounded by turbines in rural Ontario supposed to do?
Forced relocation is not the answer!
This government has been put on notice of people who are now experiencing serious cumulative impacts to their heart. They have had medical tests to prove that their cardiac instability to rule out the possibility of typical causative factors. They are willing to present their relevant medical evidence to Minister Christine Elliot in the witness of trusted advocates and key Ministers within this government. This information was sent to her and to key people, in early October and has been sent again and again since then….no response…stonewalled!

Bernie Cusack
Reply

Good organizations don’t just knock the opposition but acknowledge positive things they do. Wind turbines do produce some green energy even if much less than was forecast and not necessarily when needed. They are unreliable, costly and very suspect in health issues. Instead of trying to blow an unsatisfactory system out of the water, it would make sense to give advice on how to make it work while avoiding health problems. If wind turbines were used to pump water to reservoirs on high ground, said turbines possibly being located offshore or where they did not impact residents, the reservoir would become a battery, letting water flow down through a turbine where it would produce a constant flow of electricity. There might be a second reservoir below and the same water used over and over, and they might also be used for recreational purposes. A similar system with smaller wind turbines located on top of high-rise buildings could provide power to that building and possibly also have a pool on top and on the bottom. Solar could be utilized the same way in this part of the world, i.e. to run pumps.

Richard Mann
Reply

Bernie Cusack writes: “Instead of trying to blow an unsatisfactory system out of the water it would make sense to give advice on how to make it work while avoiding health problems.”

Turbines must be stopped until proven safe. We can no longer experiment on humans living near turbines.

There is no “quick fix”. We cannot block or cancel out infra sound. Nor can we make an intermittent energy source useful.

Turbines must be stopped.

Richard Mann
University of Waterloo

Parker Gallant
Reply

Bernie, What your suggesting is we should double-up on the costs of producing energy out of sync with demand by paying for unneeded power via the pumping concept. Also Ontario’s geography doesn’t present the opportunities you suggest unless you plan to flood out some existing towns/villages, etc! Most wind generation in Ontario happens in the spring and fall when demand is low and our nuclear and hydro are more than sufficient and quite reliable. We still have to pay for their generation at that time and do so when the wind generators curtail production or we export it to NY and Michigan at a huge loss. Generating electricity from wind is very old technology first created by Sir James Blyth in 1887. It never caught on then for the same reason–out of sync with demand. On your other suggestion–I would not want to live in a building with wind turbines on the top due to the vibrations they cause (see Stan Thayer’s comment above) which would weaken the structure. My guess is no engineer in their right mind would suggest that. The other issue about wind turbines in addition to the noise and infra-sound issue is their unique ability to kill endangered bird and bat species. As I suggested above–it is old technology and its time to give it up!

Bernie Cusack
Reply

p.s. An alternative to running wind turbines period would be the technology being developed in B.C. (and Alberta too apparently). See “Carbon Engineering”.

Bernie Cusack
Reply

I agree wholeheartedly with you, Parker and Richard Mann!
Pat Cusack (Bernie’s wife!)

Bernie Cusack
Reply

As someone who spent most of my working life ibn the service industry I learned eARLY ON TO IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM PRIOR TO TRYING TO FIX IT. I can also remember way back in school days being told to pay attention. There are many problems with wind and solar but that does not mean the power they produce is bad. I don’t like those great big monsters either and my township is being infested with them. A major problem with wind and solar is storage of the electricity produced. A water reservoir is a storage battery. Using windmills to pump water is something the Dutch have done for a long long time and the only complaints we ever hear about the Dutch is that they are stubborn. You do not need monster windmills to pump water and if necessary several could be used at one time. Solar could also be used to pump water and lot of bldgs. currently have pools on top. How high do they need to be to turn a turbine? I don’t know but with a University behind you I am sure you can come up with the answers. Do we have place in Ontario to store that water? We have the Niagara Escarpment, we have the Beaver Valley. We have Ski hill Just north of Barrie and we certainly have many other areas. It is one thing to be against things but quite another to look at the good that may be enclosed and determine how it can be made to work for all.

Richard Mann
Reply

Bernie Cusack writes: ” … I don’t know but with a University behind you I am sure you can come up with the answers.”

Dear Bernie,

Are you referring to me? I do not “have a University behind me”.

I am a single professor working independently, working in both research and advocacy on wind turbine issues.

I have not met anyone in my institution or in government who is willing to speak publicly about the known health harm caused by Industrial Wind Turbines.

Richard Mann
University of Waterloo

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